We Bet Everything on FCP X – Here’s What Happened

June 20, 2013
Gabe Cheifetz

FCPFutureUPDATE: Lively discussion going on in the comments. Click on the title of this blog post above to read/participate.

Two years ago, I announced on this blog that we were betting our business on FCP X. Here’s what happened.

But first, a quick bit of history.

The Days of Dinosaurs – 2010

In 2010, there were are a small handful of tiny companies making Master Templates for FCP 6/7. There was Sam at FinalCutProTemplates.com (now SquidFX), MotionVFX, Mark Spencer, and idustrial Revolution. CrumplePop’s innovation was to use the Master Templates architecture to make things that were more like general-purpose plugins. The problem was that Master Templates in FCP were often buggy and unpredictable. But they worked well enough to build a small business around, and soon it was so successful that Jed, the co-founder of CrumplePop, could stop eating pizza out of the dumpster (the one in back of Little Caesar’s on E. Lake St. in Minneapolis). It was starting to go well. Then FCP X shipped.

FCP X Ships – 2011

The day FCP X was released, we could barely believe what we were seeing. While everyone else was engaging in an embarrassing internet tantrum and calling it clever things like “iMovie Pro”, we were looking closely at the new Effects architecture. What we discovered there was eerie.

It looked like Apple had carefully studied how we made products in FCP 6/7, and then created a ridiculously powerful tool set just for us. Even some of the terminology was the same as ours – for instance, calling the new tools “Effects” instead of “plugins” or “templates”. Within days, it was obvious that FCP X was a serious platform, an incredible gift to developers, and the future. We immediately started developing for FCP X exclusively. When CrumplePop announced this, people thought we were nuts and in some cases reacted with genuine indignation. As it turned out, we weren’t nuts.

The Plugin Explosion – 2012

In the two years since FCP X was introduced, there has been what FCP.co refers to as “The Plugin Explosion.” With a running start, and thanks to FCP X’s remarkable Effects architecture, we were able to ship a full suite of useful plugins for FCP X within a year of it shipping. To our amazement, sales of FCP X plugins were strong right away.

The strength of the new platform was almost immediately obvious. While internet forums were busy bemoaning the fate of Apple’s supposedly once-great NLE, we were seeing a very different story in our sales stats. People were adopting FCP X – and quickly. Plugins for FCP X became our best-selling products almost overnight.

Then a fascinating thing happened: A new crop of FCP X plugin developers emerged. Empowered by the excellent development tools Apple had made available in Motion 5, and inspired to a greater or lesser extent by CrumplePop, a bunch of new players jumped in. If imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, we were very flattered. Suddenly we were the old-timers.

Today, just two short years after FCP X shipped, there is an entire plugin ecosystem around FCP X. This is to the enormous benefit of editors, and we are proud to have played a role in it. To my knowledge, it is unique among NLE platforms. It’s our hope that Apple continues to develop the Motion-based effects architecture in FCP X, to make more creative, more powerful plugins possible.

Final Cut Amateur

At the June 2013 WWDC keynote, Apple announced a new Mac Pro, and specifically called out support for video editors and FCP X. With that announcement, we can now officially conclude the “Is FCP X pro?” discussion. Are there features we’d like to see added to FCP X? For sure. But we now have good reason to believe they will happen.

So Who Uses FCP X?

Two years ago, I predicted that within a year, FCP X would be the platform used by most professional video editors. Is that true? It’s impossible to say, because “professional video editor” is a concept that is being redefined as I write this.

We talk to a lot of FCP X users. They are a diverse group of editors who are difficult to make generalizations about. If I log into our order system and look at our most recent customers, here’s what I see (this is a real list – whoever bought one of our plugins and had a web site I could check out is listed here):

- A Danish production company specializing in journalistic pieces

- A major American newspaper and media group

- A small American marketing firm

- A small American producer of branding content

- An American indie filmmaker

- A graphic designer

- A boutique Dutch mobile and creative agency

- An award-winning freelance editor based in New York

- An Italian record label

- A small music marketing firm based in Nashville

- A UK-based guitar retailer

- A California-based maker of longboard skateboards

- A mobile app developer

- An American wedding videographer

- An Australian singer-songwriter

- A Canadian company specializing in social media advertising

About 50% of our users are U.S.-based.

The Future: Access to Tools

The Whole Earth Catalog had a simple motto: “Access to Tools.” For us, this is the future– bringing increasingly powerful tools to the people on the above list. To this end, we’ve put together partnerships with Red Giant and Dale Grahn, and we have some big, exciting stuff in the works. In the spirit of FCP X, we plan to put previously inaccessible tools in as many hands as possible.

Take a longer look at the above list, and you start to get a sense that the world of video editing is expanding and changing incredibly fast, and that FCP X is playing a big part in that. For those of us who work in this industry, it’s utter mayhem. Which is a big part of what makes it fun.

Gabe Cheifetz, co-founder, CrumplePop
gabe [at] crumplepop.com

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175 Comments. Leave new

Rock on, Gabe.
(That’s meant to conjure an image of Nick Cage in a Lynch movie.)

In a few years everyone will forget any of that happened :-)

Congrats.

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FCP 7 til X is Pro! Besides, I don’t like change, but I like my render breaks!!

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100+ clients with thousands of projects in FCP I need to reference back to and media organized on raids… I own FCX but I’ve never used it.

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All I can say is keep your copy of FCP 7 around and open it when you need it (which will naturally be less and less over time) FCP 10 I have found to be so much faster to work with mostly because of redesigned editing mechanics (which take some learning) and the new 64 bit processing. There are many advantages that you’ll find as you learn it. I had to go back to FCP 7 and it was painful. So slow and it has such a clumsy UI after the time I’ve spent in FCP 10. Don’t let old projects that you may or may not need slow you down on new projects. Just the thoughts of a former FCP 7 and Premiere CS6 editor.

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When Apple makes the changes, I’ll give X another try and work myself off Final Cut 7. I’d LOVE to be using your plug-ins.

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What changes?

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Bill Streeter
June 21, 2013 12:07 pm

You do realize that Apple has released 8 revisions to FCPX since it’s launch, right?

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Craig Shamwell
June 21, 2013 12:55 pm

To say what you just said with no specifics is not helpful, to you…at all. How can you possibly know what it does or what it has if you don’t even try it….for $300!! Trust when I say you will kick yourself when you realize your stubbornness has kept you form experiencing a very good NLE, with flexibility and speed FCP7 cannot even approach. So do you have any specifics?

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adam chesbrough
June 20, 2013 10:36 pm

excellent tools and even better service, keep it going

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I’ve loved the ease of use and intuition of FCPX from the moment it came out. I only see it getting better and with plugins that rock like yours. I still have friends that use Final Cut Pro 7 and insist their is better as FSPX cannot do everything FCP7 can yet I have not found that to be the case. Then again, I’m not looking for a way to slam FCPX either.

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Ajax Perro Valiente
June 20, 2013 10:38 pm

Great article!

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Go for it, Gabe!

The future is here, despite what the naysayers think!
You guys have proved that you are a leading part of the way the industry is going.

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Former FCP7 editor
June 20, 2013 10:39 pm

You asked “Is FCP X pro?”. The answer is still “NO”. Hoping to have new features included in it is wishful thinking, and basing everything on a system that hasn’t been release yet is non-sense. You can put lipstick on a pig, and it’s still a pig, and as O.K. as FCPX is, it’s no FCS3, that’s for sure!

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It’s not FCS 3, or 4 for that matter, on purpose…

And hoping for new features isn’t wishful thinking, Apple has been constantly adding features (adding some back some may argue) to FCP X.

I don’t know what you mean by a system that hasn’t been released yet either? FCP X was out when Crumple Pop choose to create products solely for it.

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At this point Jesus Christ could come back, write the code for FCPX himself and make it divinely auto-edit your projects and it STILL wouldn’t matter; FCPX has been run out of LA on a rail. It’s been abandoned from film schools, post houses and nearly every indie workstation. Obviously there are still a handful of users that it works for for the same reasons iMovie filled a niche and it’ll flounder around as long as Apple still supports it. However, as for being a professional product, there is no way to save FCPX or Apple in the professional industry. It’s over. And even by some miracle it were possible to save it, that ended with the new Mac ‘Pro’. Breaks my heart, but Apple have committed suicide in the professional industry. My mom still loves it though. She loves to ‘share’ her ‘events’ recorded on her ‘devices’ via YouTube.

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Jim. Hate to say it, but you will be eating your words in a couple years. It’s not everywhere now, but it will be. Not saying that because I’m a fan, but because I’ve spent a *lot* of time working in it. It’s getting better. It takes advantage of the hardware in ways that the other NLEs don’t/can’t. It’s built on fresh code and also on elements of the OS, which makes it very stable. Yes, it may look like iMovie (I admit to that!) but once you work on a few projects with it, things begin to “click.”

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Everytihng is cyclical. Look on job boards in LA and 90% of posts looking for an editor ask for Avid editors. ALl my grad school friends from 3 years ago had to scramble and relearn a whole new system because Apple essentially through away the money and time they spent using and mastering FCP7. I feel sorry for them. But I agree, things WILL always change, fortunately we’ll never know how they’ll turn out. It’s what makes life interesting.

I just think it is funny the short sightedness of so many people. Editors were saying the EXACT same things about the original FCP back when it came out and time shut them right up. Now you have a team with FCP 7′s history that created FCP 10 and have been updating/improving it at a phenomenal rate and people really don’t think it will rise to dominate? Riiiiiight. Their illusions will be shattered as the next generation of editors rises up using FCP 10.

Bill Streeter
June 21, 2013 12:19 pm

I’m sorry, I didn’t realize that “LA” was the sum total of the professional industry. I think the post above shows that there’s been wide adoption of the product among professionals. And the pro editing market is much broader than TV and Film. There are hundreds of new uses for video that never existed before that are outside of the broadcast and film business and there are many more kinds of businesses that do internal video production. So the definition of “pro” is much broader than it’s ever been before. It seems that you yourself have the irrational bias against it. Wouldn’t it be better to keep an open mind and acknowledge that yes indeed there is a professional market for FCPX and maybe even test it out yourself and see exactly what it is that you have decided to dislike so much? Seems like a more rational approach than just making sweeping statements about how “Apple committed suicide” and “it will never be pro”

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Making $20 an hour editing some wedding video on FCP X does not make you a pro. You’re employed, but you’re not a professional editor. And yes, LA is the majority of professional film and television production here in the US. Some graphic designer in Kansas who edits a few three min videos for his company is not an editor.

“Making $20 an hour editing some wedding video on FCP X does not make you a pro. You’re employed, but you’re not a professional editor. And yes, LA is the majority of professional film and television production here in the US.”

Great observation! Would you be able to let us all know what qualifies you to decide what “pro” means? I’d be really interested to know that…

Former FCP7 editor
June 21, 2013 4:46 pm

Let’s be clear, Apple is not “Adding new Features” to FCPX. They are adding features back in that they were boneheaded enough not to port over from FCP7. Also, ever notice how it’s not FCP8? That’s because it’s iMovie X. I think that just about sums up everything. It’s still a pig!

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Current Editor
June 21, 2013 6:58 pm

If you think it’s only adding features “back”, then you have obviously not picked it up. First of all FCPX shares nothing with FCP7 except a name and shouldn’t be compared feature to feature, but since you are, here are some things FCPX can do that FCP7 cannot.

Auto-sync multi-cameras using audio. Partially disable sections of audio without cutting or harming clip. Smart collections to automatically collect clips into bins based on criteria. Sorting clips by multiple keyword tags. Fully editable effects, transitions generators, and titles. Change titles directly in the canvas. Fully functional and adjustable green screen keyer. Clip based color, saturation, and balance. Audition clips to try out different edits without having to create new sequences. Far superior multicam which can handle different frame sizes, codecs, and rates.

So please stop aping complaints from 2 years ago. Either use it or not, but let go of the small minded hate.

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Craig Shamwell
June 21, 2013 1:00 pm

So here is your challenge ‘FCCP7E’, explain why you think FCPX is not “Professional”! You call it a “Pig”, when companies like Black Magic Design and others have made software and hardware directly compatible with FCPX! Why spend so much time and money of a “PIG”? Share with all of us your well thought out reason why FCPX is not “Pro”!

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Former FCP7 editor
June 21, 2013 6:04 pm

Sure. One simple word. Money. They know that all the FCP lovers will flock to it like lemmings off a cliff. Can’t sum it up any better than that!

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Every professional video house I know of has either moved to Adobe or Avid. Either that or they continue to use FCP 7. Final Cut X was developed to reach the prosumer market because of the DSLR explosion. Final Cut X is great for a certain audience, not for someone working in a professional environment. I can define professional video editor for you since you think it’s changing as you write this. A professional video editor needs to be able handle any video source that could possibly come in an output the same way. Final Cut X can’t do this. Which means it is not for a professional.

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Can you tell us the video source that FCP X can’t handle?

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Zach, a comment like this really shows a level of ignorance about the program that seriously weakens your argument. I suggest you talk to some music video editors I know cutting raw R3D footage in FCPX and then come back to the discussion.

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Iain Philpott
June 21, 2013 12:00 am

I cant speak worldwide but In the UK that just simply is not true.

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Clearly your biased really I can do so much more and so much faster and have edited feature films. Most editors and professionals that I have talked to are mad about the price point only being $300 and now everyone can edit and I cannot charge for the RENDERING TIME! ….. Guess what now its time to care about how you shoot and edit the project any editing program can cut. FCPX has increased my time and these wonderful plugins have increased my clientele.

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Bill Streeter
June 21, 2013 12:23 pm

Your statement that FCPX can’t handle every video source and that’s a requirement for every professional video editor seems to indicate that you don’t know much about FCPX and that you have a very narrow idea of what a professional video editor is.

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Craig Shamwell
June 21, 2013 1:06 pm

Zach many have challenged you, but I know you won;t come back with anything to support your post because it simply is not true, especially with Compressor Settings. You are just another FCPX hater because it looked similar to iMovie, which many a Professional uses to do quick cuts. I know you won’t come back to defend yourself because once you do your research you will know that what you said was false.

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Nicely put.
Good read.

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Corwin Stone
June 20, 2013 10:44 pm

Congrats Gabe. If we are not taking risks, how can we be expected to innovate. Good work!

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It’s not about risk taking – they had a professional set of tools that people’s lives depended on then they threw them away for a handful of magic beans. Sure, if you’ve got an intelligent, innovative way to make the old tools better, hooray, go for it. Throwing the baby out with the bathwater because the old code didn’t translate easily to 64bit processing is insane. FCPX is the worst choice any company has made, ever. It’s like Ferrari dropping their current line up to make SmartCars.

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Craig Shamwell
June 21, 2013 1:10 pm

Tim…one question…..do you, or have you ever used Final Cut Pro X for more than a week? “Magic Beans” you say! Faster, more productive, much cleaner design, and much cheaper, and just as this article boasts, much more support from third party developers! If that’s Magic Beans, then I’m all in!!!!!

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Used FCPX for 3 months. I wanted to like it. I took the time to explore everything it had to offer. I was patient and embraced it. At the end of those 3 months I got a refund from Apple and deleted every remnant of it from my computer (and yes, I was using the most recent version). Actually spent last night trying out Premier and it’s everything Final Cut 8 should have been. It’s basically FCP 7 but has the processing power of FCPX, integrates with speedgrade and AE. Adobe gets it. It kinda blew my mind if I’m honest. And it only exaggerated what a let down FCPX is. It breaks my heart.

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Sounds like you did your trial VERY early on after the software’s release- since Apple stopped providing refunds by 10.0.2 or 10.0.3. MUCH has changed and been added since then.

“It’s basically FCP 7″

Yep. All the track tetris of 7, and the multi paned interface madness of Adobe apps. I like Pr FWIW. It’s like a comfy old shoe. Personally, I ike new shoes though. If ya don’t like X, don’t use it. But bashing it as a “prosumer” app just shows how little you know about it. You’re not alone. :-)

brilliant blog and bravo to you guys at crumple pop for having the balls to gamble on a then new product…but your dues paid off…FCPX is now awesome and guess what, you guys arrived on the same creative flight.
Thanks for making our world, a far better creative one…:)
Cheers, Michael

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Hey Gage,
I use your plug ins all the time. Did you think I reviewed and forgot them. Shame on you;-)
Steve

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Iain Philpott
June 20, 2013 10:53 pm

I have Platinotype, Shrinkray, Splitscreen and Lumineux. I have bought each individually for specific jobs and have used all apart from Splitscreen (job went away!). They have integrated fantastically in FCPX, have been true to the FCPX ethos of simplicity in use and do exactly what it ‘says on the tin’. As a fashion photographer straddling the line of stills and motion you do supply what I’m looking for. Well done guys – keep up the excellent work!
ps. I also love your 24/48hr sales!
pps. I would love to upgrade everything to 4K ready?

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Gabe Cheifetz
June 21, 2013 2:20 am

Thank you! We’re trying to gauge how common the 4K FCP X workflow is right now. If enough people ask for it, we’ll jump in.

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Chris Fenwick
June 20, 2013 10:56 pm

When i first read your ‘exposé’ on the how you were betting everything on FCPX I was impressed… I didn’t think you were crazy, but i KNEW you were visionary. It was my growing fascination with the app that brought me to your site after all.
Today, I’m THOROUGHLY excited to see what is unfolding in front of us and I continually have people approach me and ask me questions about FPCX in a hushed tone that makes me feel they are doing something elicit.
Keep up the good work Crumple Poppers. Its been a fun ride and there is so much more ahead.

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Gabe Cheifetz
June 21, 2013 4:43 am

Thanks, Chris. And we’re thoroughly excited about your new show.

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It’s true that FCPX got off to a rocky start and Apple fumbled the introduction a little bit, but I saw the potential early on. When I discovered CrumplePop your color kit was one of the first things I bought. I wasn’t even using FCPX full time at that point. I’ve picked up a few other CrumplePop effects and they have been really useful. So glad you guys got behind FCPX.

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I have this distinct feeling that you guys are onto something big. Stay close to your instincts.

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You and guys are awesome. Love your products, attitude and blog posts! So glad you bet the farm on FCPX. Together you make beautiful stuff happen!

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Hello Apple Funboy. I had to switch to Adobe because FCP X lacks many “must have” features.

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You mention “must have” features in air quotes, but what features are must have that are missing?

Applicable examples help hold up your arguments.

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Not that there’s any nitpicking going on in this discussion, but I believe “air quotes” are made in the air.

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Hah, oops. I imagined them being made in the air, can’t keep real life separate from digital comments. ;)

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Ya what Ryan said. Because I switched from Adobe to FCP 10. So why?

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Craig Shamwell
June 21, 2013 1:18 pm

Again, another editor who used FCPX when it first came out, with no clue of how well it works now! When Adobe did their big changes on Premiere, I had major problems with it and never went back as I was deciding which to use. FCPX is so good now, with more to do, no doubt! For the money, its untouchable.

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Yep, I remember reading that post where you stated you were betting everything on FCPX and I was one of those that cheered you on Im proud to say! I, like most FCP editors had some concerns when X was first announced and FCP studio was dropped overnight. However, I didn’t abandon ship! There were plenty of restrooms and running water available and the cruses continued and are now being booked up so I’m glad I made the right decision! Besides, I don’t know how long I could have tread in the shark infested Adobe waters! :)

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Nice editorial, and very true.

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While i have no desire to ever use FC-X again for pro use I am enamored with your products and innovation. I can only hope some day they will play nice with avid and adobe .
I wish you all the best continued success.

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Gabe Cheifetz
June 21, 2013 2:23 am

That’s great to hear – thank you.

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most of the editors i know use premiere or avid. per fcp x, most the editors i know used fcp.

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Jyoti Mishra (White Town)
June 20, 2013 11:29 pm

I *love* FCPX and I *love* your plugins. I also love that you have great demos of your plugins and then make actually buying your stuff painless. A lot of businesses could learn from you. Seriously.

As the owner of my own label and the maker of all promotional vids for that label, I salute you! You’re giving us indie musicians / video makers brilliant tools at the right price. Keep it up! :-)

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Jeremy Wilker (@TWEAK)
June 20, 2013 11:33 pm

Nice Gabe. And yet people still are on twitter complaining about it. Have they not updated since the release? Have they used it on an actual project for more than a few minutes? I think not. I enjoy FCPX and it doesn’t get in my way. Smooth experience and speedy as well.

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Gabe Cheifetz
June 21, 2013 2:30 am

Yeah, I wish people would debate specifics. btw I have a copy of Triumph 67 kind of on display on my desk.

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Christopher Justice
June 20, 2013 11:35 pm

Sparksight loves CrumplePop and Final Cut X! Smart move by very smart people.

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Vanguard Media & Entertainment
June 20, 2013 11:50 pm

Crumplepop makes great plugins and I have used them A LOT over the years with FCP, however, I will not be using them with Final Cut X (note NOT Final Cut Pro X) as FCX is not for professional broadcast editors such as myself. I have moved on to both Avid MC 6.5 (waiting on MC7) and Adobe CC with Adobe Premier 6.

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Tell me more. I must have been high when I cut the dozens of TV spots in X that I delivered last year.

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Walter Gonet
June 20, 2013 11:50 pm

I love FCPX. When it came out I almost agreed with other comments made, It was missing some features that I wanted but some items mentioned by others that it couldn’t do – they were wrong. It was done differently than FCP7 and when learned it , made editing faster than FCP7. It really was lot better when it became FCP 10.0.6 which made it faster. The biggest item I liked is when they added multi-cam. And now they want to get into 4K. I think Apple is going to be way in advanced editing. Keep up the good work.

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Glad you guys are having success! To the naysayers about this software being not being pro, Tsui Hark, a legend of Hong Kong cinema, cut his new 3D movie with it. It will play in theaters. That is Pro! Just because you don’t like doesn’t mean it’s not Pro.

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In the professional industry, Final Cut and Apple are over. Sure little guys and wedding photographers might still suffer with it for budgetary reasons – but there will be no more Mac in a post house environment once FCP7 becomes obsolete. Everyone who needs working tools have gone Avid/Premier. Idk what we’re going to put a RedRocket in next year, but it certainly won’t be a Mac ‘Pro’ X (the X stands for ‘debacle’). Its so sad but the only thing keeping Apple alive now are phones and the memory of Steve – and that ain’t gonna last much longer. Btw, as a Final Cut user since 99, I was forced to switch to Avid. I’ve also spent the week shopping PCs. Yeah, its that bad now.

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No, it’s not that bad. Forced to switch to AVID? I enjoy the the workflow, metatagging, editing while I’m importing footage AND cutting my edit time per project by at least 25-30%…all because of FCPX. What could you do with 25% of your time back? Bring on more clients…or just sit back and enjoy!!!

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You’re right, it’s not that bad – if you’re cutting YouTube videos of skateboarders and wedding videos. Yes, I was forced to switch to Avid; I currently have a live multi-cam project that has 16 angles of video, 22 audio tracks, a bunch of FX, requires meticulous media management, jumping back and forth between two projects, requires shared storage between me and the FX guys, needs multiple displays just to see all the tracks and has clips from 6 legacy projects being cut into it. I also have tape to import and need to ultimately export to tape for legacy storage, engineer BluRay discs FOR SALE, export to HD and UHD for broadast, use DaVinci to color correct and ProTools for post audio (which doesn’t run on OSX 10.8 btw). Final Cut 7 would’ve been great for most of that if it had updated codecs and could render faster. And what I’m doing is relatively simple comparably speaking. Just saying, you guys who think FCPX is up to the task are beyond wrong. Just because YOU don’t need completely manual controls, substantial organization, compartmentalization, legacy project access and expandability rather that candy coated GUIs doesn’t mean someone else doesn’t. The new Mac Pro is also dead to me because no CUDA = no DaVinci. No 120Hz = no 3D. No RedRocket = no R3D in 4K. Etc, etc. Sure maybe there will eventually be a peripheral to solve some of those problems but I have work to do NOW. FCPX and the new Mac Pro are DOA in a professional environment and Mac will never be trusted again.

Methinks the handful of you who like FCPX and think it’s great for everyone just because they finally added a few trinkets maybe aren’t playing at the level you think you are,

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Gabe Cheifetz
June 21, 2013 4:49 am

Thanks for listing some concrete features you’re missing in FCP X. I wish other people would do this.

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Sorry but all your comment just proved is you have no knowledge on how to use FCP 10 to do the things you need. Not that it isn’t capable. I don’t have the time to go over each point where you are way off but I have seen people doing all the things you think aren’t possible.

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Also there are already answers to all your Mac pro concerns. None of what you listed are issues. Look it up. It seems there are so many jaded editors out there that can’t get past themselves and find out how to work with the new tools. So they assume they can’t work for them and don’t look for/ignore any solutions. While others are out taking advantage of the advancements in editing technology and evolving their workflows to work with it.

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Craig Shamwell
June 21, 2013 1:31 pm

And guess what Tim, FCPX Multi-Cam editor can handle up to 64 angles of video, and as many audio tracks you can lay into it. But some of the other stuff that you state that may not be there, does not mean its not Professional! Avid, Premiere, Sony Vegas and yes Final Cut Pro X are all Pro Editors! Some have and some don’t have all you may want. But the truth is, all of these editors have resumes of work that are on Braodacast TV or in Film! This you cannot dispute. So to say that those of us who indeed make a living using FCPX exclusively are “beyond wrong” is well…. Beyond Wrong!

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Yeah Craig, they SAY it can handle up to 64 angles – try it. I did. It crashed. A lot. And good luck getting that much info through a TB1 cable. You pro FCPX guys all seem to be able to read the literature but haven’t actually tried any of these features to see if they actually work.

Blackmagic has already been testing the new MacPro with DaVinci. Grant Petty blogged that they’re utterly thrilled with it’s performance using the OpenCL GPUs.

RedRocket cards already work over TB, and will most certainly work even better over TB2.

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ps. I’ve been using Final Cut (prior AVID user) since v1.2… for $999 when everything else was started at $10,000. They said it was a gimmick then, too!

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Great post. I use fcpx daily and the crumblepop plugins are serious. Thank you

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I am a professional Broadcast Editor (18 Years in) and I swear by FCPX. In fact, in the past 2 years I’ve managed to turn 5 of my fellow editors in my facility to FCPX. My favorite thing in these replies is the people who have said they switched to Adobe or Avid because FCPX is not “Pro” but when challenged to provide some examples, no one has anything to say. Granted, if you work in a group environment with multiple editors working on the same project, FCPX is not there yet. I know there are missing features, roundtrip, better audio etc. But I can tell you this… I recently got a freelance gig to help a station in Memphis. They had Premiere (my previous LOVE). It was like going back in time. I installed FCPX immediately and began cranking out some damn good looking stuff. Oh and by the way, FCPX also helped me fetch an Emmy. I don’t know if that’s considered professional enough or not. You guys made a great decision.

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UGH. Every word of this is a lie. Professionals don’t have to freelance in Memphis on Craigslist gigs. Tell you what though, I’ll apologize and go back to FCPX if you tell us your real name and what you won an Emmy for.

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Jim, tone down the blind angry ignorance and come to terms with the fact that people are using FCP 10 professionally and are doing very well with it. Chris’s story is just one of a ton I have seen. FCP 10 has become a very capable editing tool. It’s as Pro as its user.

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This story is just that, a story. You know tons of examples of somebody whose won an Emmy using FCPX? Prove it. Name one and I’ll buy you a new Mac Pro.

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Dang I guess Marcus gets the new Mac Pro…

Wow, a LOCAL Emmy for a tidbit on an affiliate that doesn’t even have an IMDB page. That’s a pretty big deal. Somebody get David Fincher on the horn and tell him his workflow problems are solved. If he can get in touch with the team who won the local Special Reporting Emmy for a piece they did on the YMCA! I’m not kidding. This is the example you use? I guess I can stop posting if you’re just going to make my argument against FCPX better than I can. Wait, this will make it easier – the director, videographer and host were all George Oliphant so that should make tracking the team down easier. Andrew Banks, the editor doesn’t have an IMDB page so it’s gonna be tough to find him. You may also notice in the article about how FCPX was used to edit this ‘Emmy award winner’ that no one ever actually talked to the EDITOR. The producer waxed philosophical about why HE liked FCPX alot… would’ve been far more enlightening if the person who actually cut it had had some input.

Seriously, talk about grasping at straws. That article borders on fraud.

http://www.nyemmys.org/attachments/wysiwyg/5423/56th%20NY%20Emmy%20Awards%20Winners%20Press%20Release.pdf

As a professional Final Cut Pro editor, I can tell you I haven’t come across a machine running X in the 2 years it’s been out. Not once. In 20 or 30 jobs. Mostly in Hollywood but everywhere else I’ve been too. Simple answer to your question, Is it Pro? No. So your gamble was not on whether or not X would break through the pro barrier. A few independent filmmakers does not an industry make. Your bet paid off because a lot of people who didn’t know how to edit decided to start learning. Not a bad thing but not at all proving the success of X as a powerful NLE. It doesn’t compare to the pro options.

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Gabe Cheifetz
June 21, 2013 4:33 am

I’ve heard a bunch of Hollywood post folks say this. I’m interested in what specific features make FCP 7 more pro than FCP X. That’s a sincere question – I’m very familiar with both platforms and the enthusiasm for FCP 7 is mystifying to me.

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A bunch of stuck up people ignoring FCP 10 does not make a non-pro tool. The pro is in the user. Just because they are missing out doesn’t say crap about the software. I’ve used it everyday to make money for the last year. I’m very familiar with FCP 7 Premiere and FCP 10. Unless you really have daily, in depth, working knowledge of the NLE then I’m sorry but you have no idea what you are talking about.

A couple weeks ago I had to do some work on FCP 7 again and it was painful. The advancement’s to the editing mechanics FCP 10 made are awesome. It is such a contrast. It really has ruined FCP 7 and Premiere for me. They are great NLE’s but from personal experience I would never again choose to use them. You definitely can not appreciate the changes until you really grasp the purpose behind them and all their functions. Which requires you to actually learn.

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What do you define as pro? At what level project does it count as a pro. If I cut $10-$20,000 commercial videos on it, does that count? Do feature films count? How about wedding videos? I know wedding videographers who make up to $8,000/wedding. Do they count?. How about music videos shot on the RED for high profile country and Christian music artists in Nashville? Does that count as pro? Just curious as to what your definition of “pro” is? Not being a smart ass, I really want to know.

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We still produce our spots with fcp7. Probably will until some of the simpler features of fcp7 are introduced to fcpx. It just makes things go faster. Fcpx slows our workflow.

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What is missing/can’t be altered for your workflow that is holding you back? Cause from personal experience I can’t think what could do that. FCP X is massively faster for me then FCP 7 was. Going back to FCP 7 is plainly slow now.

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Two years ago this video was poignant. Today it’s pointless.

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Fcp x is and will be the one everyone will copy. Apple will get the last Laugh. Final Cut Pro X the best that’s all there is to it. Have a nice day everyone.

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Haha nice.

Interesting point though. About everything Adobe ahas added to Premiere in CS6 and now CC was copied from FCP 10.

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Michael Cooper
June 21, 2013 1:15 am

We switched to FCPX from the intro. Never looked back. Looking forward to more and better.
Use and love Crumplebox, as well.

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I disagree with Julio. FCPX is a pro NLE app. I’ve been editing with FCP from its inception. X is the best version to date. Unbelievably powerful. And I use CrumplePop effects. Not because I don’t know how to edit but because CP makes my editing easier for certain effects. So that CP for betting the farm on FCPX.

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The whole debate is ridiculous. Think of the world’s greatest sculptors arguing over which brand of chisel is best. Each of us will have to find the product that works best for us. The era of “I’m an editor, so i use product x” is over. If Avid and/or Premiere work for you, great, and vice versa for FCPX users. There’s nothing to be gained by stating that one is better than the other, or that one is the choice of “professional” editors.

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Gabe Cheifetz
June 21, 2013 4:56 am

A quick internet search reveals that sculptors do indeed argue over which brand of chisel is best:

http://forums.dfoggknives.com/index.php?showtopic=16741

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Steve McGarrigle
June 21, 2013 9:26 am

LOL Brilliant!

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That is freaking awesome. Nice find Gabe.

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I actually disagree about debates being ridiculous. Mature, respectful and informed debate/discussion is actually good for those filmmakers trying to make real decisions. It’s true that a real artist could use any number of tools and create great art. But practically speaking, many people are earning a living doing this. They need to make real, pragmatic decisions. And some NLEs may be good for them and others not. What hurts the industry is when professionals make baseless and/or strictly emotional commentary about tools, passing along bad/wrong info. If someone doesn’t like FCPX, there’s nothing wrong with that. But give us practical and informed reasons why. It seems like a majority of the negative FCPX comments on this blog post are based on a total lack of understanding about what the feature sets are. I have a lot more respect for a review or a professional’s comment when it’s based on real facts.

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sean j vincent
June 21, 2013 1:35 am

Switched from FCP7 to FCPX and don’t regret it for a second. What an amazing piece of creative software. It’s very pro… it does everything i need and i’m editing features. Premiere Pro is the old dog stuck in the past. Avid is the same safe but dull thing it’s always been. FCPX is a new paradigm..it takes time and an open mind to get into the flow with it, but when you get there, it’s awesome. I edit faster for sure…but also better. I injest multiple formats, i output to a pro monitor and i don’t let old habits stop me from improving my way of working. Not one person asked at my last premiere ‘What did you edit that on?” No one gives a shit. Make good stuff, that’s it.

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Patrick Wells
June 21, 2013 1:48 am

You bet on X because your plugins are for a prosumer market who don’t know a thing about professional color correction.

No professional would ever use any of your plugins. They MIGHT use your grain, but not as a plugin, and instead as a 4k video layer.

That’s why your bet paid off. That’s why there was a “plugin explosion.” Because there was an explosion of amateurs buying DSLRs, shooting everything at a f1.4, and wanting to call themselves “pros” even though they don’t know how to do anything.

Your plugins fill that niche well.

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Gabe Cheifetz
June 21, 2013 5:41 am

The BBC, CNN, Fox, and MTV are all customers of ours. So are tons of ad agencies and small studios. I haven’t noticed any particular preference for f1.4.

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Patrick Wells
June 23, 2013 3:54 am

Which products are those companies using? As I said, I’d bet on the grain and only the grain.

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Patrick, here’s your sign….

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Burnell Yow!
June 21, 2013 1:57 am

Congrats on your success at Crumplepop. As a satisfied user of several of your effects plugins for FCP X, I wish you all the best.

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Okay, West Virginia Jack Kelly. I love how the links here are a who’s who of pseudo-pro editors. Try cutting a network show on your powerful X. I think that should be the litmus test. Whether or not the content your cutting will make you a living wage. I’m betting on the work that pays me. Good luck with yours.

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Oh you want a network show? Ok here ya go: http://www.apple.com/finalcutpro/in-action/electric/

Sorry but I am one of many editors I know making money with it. Your lack of knowledge about FCP 10 doesn’t determine it’s usability.

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Still working with FCP 7 and love it, but am very excited to learn FCP X as well. The more you know. . .

I’ve recently discovered CrumplePop and look forward to seeing what your tools can do for my projects. Keep up the good creative work!

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MichaelKasino
June 21, 2013 2:55 am

Thanks Gabe. Great note. I usually wait a bit for the first version software dust to settle, but I guess it’s time to get X wet.

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These comments are hilarious! FCP X is freaking awesome, once you get your head around it. Is it perfect? Nope. Does it have some odd quirks that need some attention? Yep. But I’ve been on FCP since it came out, own Pr, and MC, and X is by far my favorite tool, warts and all. I work in LA, and cut trailers. I’ve won multiple Key Art and Golden Trailer awards. Stuff I’ve cut on X has been in theters and national TV. I’m a “pro”, whatever that means. I cut on whatever suits the gig, and X is my go to NLE these days.

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heh, I can edit, but apparently I can’t spell or construct coherent sentences. :-)

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Gabe Cheifetz
June 21, 2013 5:12 am

Hey Charlie, can you shoot me an email? gabe [at] crumplepop.com.

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May I ask a simple question? Why is it so pressing for Avid/Premiere editors to exhaustively disparage and discredit FCPX at any opportunity that presents itself?

Can you imagine if large posse’s of FCPX people went into Avid and Creative Cloud forums/blogs/etc and insisted that everyone using those tools “wasn’t pro” and “couldn’t ever make rent in LA?” They are clearly so nervous, defensive and aggressive they would smash their smartphones into the concrete. Maybe we should.

But seriously, one hopes no one who pays for editing or plugins reads this drivel, because the slander might affect business. And that would be awful. Coming onto this developer’s site and telling everyone that they are fools to buy the products…for what reason precisely?…sigh. I’m impressed the developer is this restrained and not censoring all this BS outtahere.

The new Mac Pro with FCPX is going to be the go-to machine, and I hope we can identify all the haters and quote them a couple years from now when everyone knows they’re stupid.

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I’ll tell you why; FCP7 was/is an amazing professional tool, exponentially so at it’s price point. They were on the threshold of being number one. Literally no one used Premier and most of considered Avid users holdouts who feared the future. The Mac Pro was a machine to lust after and willingly go into debt for. A lot of us, myself included, are now humiliated because we professionally stuck our necks out for Final Cut and Mac. I spent years convincing production companies to make the switch. Now not only do I have to begin again in a new NLE (it takes years to learn all the tips, tricks and workarounds), I look like a total idiot in places I spent years earning trust. Added to which, those poor production companies now have to eat the cost of undoing all the damage done in a bad economy turning Mac FCP7 bays BACK into the PC Avid bays they were before I intervened. I’m not an Avid guy – I’m a Final Cut guy. I don’t want to bash Apple, not for a second – but they’ve upended my life, trashed a brilliant tool, undone 14 years of progress, cost a lot of people a fortune in time and money and ruined their professional reputation for what? Final Cut X? None of this makes any sense. And everyone keeps saying it’s in the name of progress but I can’t figure out how cutting off your arms and legs then promising future prosthetics is progress. I also don’t know how a smaller, lighter stationary computer (the new Mac ‘pro’) with MORE cables sticking out of it, FEWER options, less expandability and ZERO 3rd party support helps the ‘pro’ industry.

All of this destruction and no visible reward. It’s been 2 years. It’s a unmitigated disaster. Can we please go back to where we left off?

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The reason Apple re-built FCPX on the iMovie foundation is simply that iMovie had already been built for 64 bit and building them on the same codebase (like Logic and Garageband…Aperture and iPhoto?) meant economies of scale and cross-pollination could kick in. This helps all sorts of things including 3rd party support. FCPX got shipped as soon as it was stable enough to do basic tasks and that is also a good idea.

The shipment of FCPX did not deactivate your FCP7 installs in any way. FCP7 hadn’t been updated significantly in four or something years by that time. If it was so great and so much greater then why not just keep using it (as many have) until the choice becomes clearer.

But clearly FCP7 was a 90′s era program and the sourcebase was an open liability. Avid and Premiere aren’t so much better than FCP7, but FCPX is a revolutionary thing. As is the Mac Pro…which will have FEWER cables (1 power cable, 1 Thunderbolt daisy chained to your RAID and your monitor is all you need for 4K workflow but go ahead and use a 2nd T2 cable if you want). Thunderbolt is way MORE expandable than three measly PCI slots, and two system-optimized GPUs toting 7 teraflops is about all you would need slots for anyway, and the whole thing I’m predicting ships for no more $ than the current clunkers.

Really so melodramatic…the drama should be in the content not the edit suite. If you want a company who mistreats their customers, I give you…hmm. Avid and their bizarre policies? Adobe and their Creative Cloud, pay me the full price of FCPX every year or you can’t open your files?

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What color was the Kool Aid they gave you?

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Gentleman Jack

Jonathan Lawrence
June 22, 2013 3:52 am

:-D

FWIW, the only thingX has in common with iMovie is the window layout (sort of) and a couple features like skimming etc. Otherwise… completely different code, FX architecture etc.

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Yeah… sorry. You’re mistaken. FCPX and iMovie share no code.

And as far as I know, iMovie is NOT 64bit in it’s latest version.

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Check back in a few months.

Things I learned from these comments:

1. There are a lot of angry/self-important people on the Internet and (possibly) working as professional video editors.

2. Gable seems to be a really nice and very patient guy.
;-)

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I second that comment whole heartedly.

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Steve McGarrigle
June 21, 2013 9:40 am

Thirded ( is that a word? )

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Raphael Brand
June 21, 2013 5:32 am

Wow. It’s very interesting reading all these comments, and what I see is that a big part of the responses are so emotional. What would really help the conversation is if all you people say way what is missing in FCP X. Or what makes FCP X so great or Avid or Adobe Premiere so great.
I am not a professional editor at all, I think editing is a real art and it means sitting for hours in front of the computer. Which is really hard on my body. I have great respect for great editors and would be thankful for clearer , less hostile responses because I am sure you all have very valuable information to share.
I think CrumplePop delivers really cool features and would love to play more with them.
Respect,
Raffa

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You can ad a school teacher to that list!

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Jakob Brodersen
June 21, 2013 6:28 am

Hey,
I’m guessing that I run the Danish company mentioned at the top of the list.
I am a journalist that does all the editing myself (as well as everything else along the production line). I’ve worked with several other editing programmes before and switched from Adobe Premiere to FCPX last year.
Based on my experience and the needs and demands of my – albeit small – company, the FCPX is a perfect fit – an intuitive, smooth running, dependable video editor that so far has been able to do anything I’ve asked it to do without giving me any hustle.
Gable, I’ve bought several of your products; ShrinkRay, SplitScreen, Finisher, Fisheye Fixer for GoPro and just recently the Film Grain v. 2.0 and I must say that I’m very pleased – they are extremely cool to work with and gives that extra touch to the final product.
Keep up the good work – I’ll definitely be back for inspiration (and shopping) at your site!

Best wishes

Jakob

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Gabe Cheifetz
June 21, 2013 5:28 pm

Hello Jakob! In fact it was your company. The mystery is revealed :) Thanks for the kind words.

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Stephen May
June 21, 2013 6:32 am

Wow – just got back from a site eval for a video job in Rifle, CO. Gabe – great blog! y’know what? I really like the comments – all of them. I work a lot – so technically I’m a pro video shooter/editor, but I’ve never done anything for the big screens / Hollywood, and I am amazed at some of the features in theaters! But attitude is so important, in any work, and in life. Gabe – you guys have a wonderful outlook, and to be honest, I’ve been with Final Cut since it was bought by Apple from Macromedia, and I admit my sideways shuffle to FCPX was awkward, but I’m doing everything on it now. I know friends who are cutting on Premiere and it seems good, and I know some intense groups like Texas Crew who are Avid guys, and used to cut on FCP7. I think X is smoking fast, and its true, you can cut H.264 MVI files from Canon DSLR’s native – just like you can in Adobe Premiere CS6. But you can cut XDCAM, HDCAM, and everything else in X too. At this point, content and purpose are really so much more important than how you made your cut, and I’m not having any issues in X. Your products can shortcut time spent in Motion 5 getting a similar effect, and saving time is important in my schedule and workflow. how can you go wrong when you can see a cup half full? Keep up the exceelent work CP!

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Stephen May
June 21, 2013 6:42 am

hey – another editor that can’t spell or form concise sentences! haha! Maybe I really am a pro!!!

So one more comment then: When i got into FCP it was largely because it was so much more affordable than AVID, and had competing features! I used to cut AB roll linear systems, then Media 100 (don’t laugh – they had varying grades) but yeah, I’m older than a lot of you guys probably. So now Apple presented a radically different take on NLE for even less money (again) and it reminds me of another company; Blackmagic Design – they’re putting out a lot of useful tools for relatively less than many other companies who produce similar products. CP is right there – good and useful tools for a reasonable price. You’re onto it!

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Gabe Cheifetz
June 21, 2013 5:38 pm

Thanks, Stephen.

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Willard Jansen
June 21, 2013 6:48 am

I think FCPX’s winning feature events. Everything is 64 bits now is so that’s no prize winner now. But events make it quick and easy to work on large projects with lots of (stock) footage. The magnetic time line is also very cool. I love to work on it on stand alone projects at my home studio. But pushing tin in true collaborative environments, will always be done on Avid Media Composer / Interplay systems I am afraid. So be sure to acquire skills and knowledge on that one too if you want to be a top notch editor.

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grateful editor
June 21, 2013 7:11 am

thanks gabe.

I was originally a bit iffy about FCPX. I edit shorts and the odd feature movie and didn’t really know if I wanted to make the move so I stuck to 7 and PremPro. Then I actually had to do something that would have taken me hours on fcp7 or PremPro and when googling how to get it right I got onto your site. I bought the effect, checked how it worked and blam. It saved me hours and it saved the client money. Both good. Your and other company’s effects have made me turn to FCPX more and more. It saves me time and it saves the client money. Over the last year I have only used PremPro 4 times, all of them for exporting things I have edited in FCPX but needed to be in 9×16 format. Thanks to guys like you my life is easier, faster and I get to spend more time with the kids.

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Gabe Cheifetz
June 21, 2013 5:41 pm

Awesome! That’s good news and good to hear.

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A good call Gabe. You make the best products for the excellent and very professional tool that is called FCPX. Personally I use X and Premiere in equal measure. Both are excellent tools, and clients have different needs

I’m constantly surprised by the very narrow minds of some editors. Your list failed to include several global broadcasters who are now using or starting to to use X for their edits. These people are conservative and will always take years to roll out new products, but it is happening and it works reliably and well.

There will always be people who cannot accept change, I feel sorry for the guy who has never opened X – why waste the money? To them I say “Get over it, sh.. happens, life moves on”. To those willing to take a chance, the world will shortly be your playground, or perhaps “the work will all be yours, soon…”

Out of interest, I have been testing a lot of gear and X handles 4k from the newest Sony F cameras far better than the much heralded Premiere CC. Interesting because these cameras are being bought in large numbers by rental houses and productions. They are already heading for ‘industry standard’ status. How are the die-hard 7 users going to edit this stuff? In some parts of the industry, 4, 5 and 6k clips are now bread and butter – the Sonys will only push that trend further across the board. Why shoot 1080 when you can future-proof you investment by capturing in 4K?

Gabe, I wish you every success in Crumplepop’s continued pursuit of excellence – it is well deserved.

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Gabe Cheifetz
June 21, 2013 5:48 pm

4K in FCP X is an interesting topic. When you add in the Sony F cams and the forthcoming Mac Pro… things start to look really interesting.

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Final Cut Pro X: 2 Years Later | Timothy A. Ryan
June 21, 2013 8:02 am

[...] was able to pick up the program pretty quickly. From what I read online, I think a lot of others were too. Apple opened up what was once a niche market and is bringing it to many more people. They see a [...]

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FCPX is fast and fun. I’m not going to poke jabs at why I think this or that NLE sucks balls, let alone try to diss it for being non-pro…BUT, I love how fast and enjoyable cutting projects is with FCPX is! I cut my paid gigs AND my for fun projects on FCPX. I don’t doubt that Premiere, Avid etc are amazing tools, and that’s what these all are…tools of our trade, for us editors who really are the unsung stars of the show, not the tools themselves!

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Took me a week to move over from FCP7 to FCPX and I think its great. Alot of people here are being very dramatic I think.

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shit it is tiring to read about all the myths from people who understood nothing..
FCPX rocks and beats Avid and Adobe times 10, and yes I have done editing for 20 years+, and I do all kinds off things i FCPX, it still the best NLE ever no matter how hard you try to tell its not…

I laugh every day of all the ignorant, sorry for you that you live in denial

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Final Cut X was developed to reach the prosumer market. Apple abandoned the pro user to make more money serving the larger amateur market. Every professional video post production house I know of has either moved to Adobe or Avid. Either that or they continue to use FCP 7. Crumple Pop if you are betting the farm on FCPX you may just be going back to pizza from the dumpster. There is no need for anyone to buy plugin for FCPX have you seen the dozens and dozens of free ones out there. Oh and yes I do own FCPX- I bought it for my 15 year old. All her amateur YouTube buddies were using it.

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ScottVid
The 15 year old amateur YouTube buddies are the future.

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:-) Yep. And I think that scares a lot of people. I’ve seen some youtube sk8r videos that editorially rival anything done by “pros”. X looks pretty simple on the surface and, unlike the button laden interfaces of Pr, MC, and FCP 7, is accessible for amateurs. But it is an insanely deep app. Shame more “pros” don’t spend the time to figure that out…

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FilmMaking Insider Tips
June 21, 2013 1:49 pm

FilmMaking Insider Tips
This is probably what you tell yourself. Do you watch films with more than a casual eye? You probably want to know how they were able to get perfect lighting in your favorite scene, or how to write a professional screenplay. Do you watch the Actor’s Studio and hang on every word they say? Go To: http://is.gd/4OTQzL

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Never used Final Cut 7. Learned how to edit on Final Cut Pro X and love it.

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The FCPX Debate Continues...
June 21, 2013 3:07 pm

[...] celebrate, plug-in creators CrumplePop have written a great blog post about how FCP has changed their business over the past 2 [...]

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Thank you Gabe for the plug-ins and for all your team’s hard work. We’ve been using FCPX at our facility now for a year and a half now and have found your software to be an awesome compliment to it. FCPX really does have a thriving plug-in community and it looks like it’s going to just keep getting better. Keep up the great work!

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Gabe Cheifetz
June 21, 2013 5:51 pm

Thanks, Josh. You guys are doing really cool stuff.

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Walter Biscardi
June 21, 2013 4:23 pm

i love Premiere so much. i would marry it if i had to. Final Cut Pro X sucks.

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C’mon Walter. As seasoned and experienced as you are in the industry, you can come up with a better critique than just “FCPX sucks.” What don’t you like about it?

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I’d be willing to bet that walter didn’t post that…

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Walter Biscardi
June 22, 2013 3:52 pm

The problem with FCPX is that it doesn’t have tracks and that it looks like iMovie. That’s not what a professional needs. A professional sits in a dark dank room, and needs to see all 99 tracks of audio and not worry about what the actual story they’re cutting actually is.

oh and by the way, go to my website. cause i know everything.

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Former FCP7 editor
June 21, 2013 4:42 pm

Let’s be clear people, Apple is not “Adding new Features” to FCPX. They are adding features back in that they were boneheaded enough not to port over from iMovie. Also, ever notice how it’s not FCP8? That’s because it’s iMovie X. I think that just about sums up everything.

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Clearly, you have no idea what you’re talking about. I think that just about sums up everything.

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Former FCP7 editor
June 21, 2013 4:42 pm

Oh, and FCPX is still a pig!

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former Avid, FCP legacy ,Current FCPX editor
June 21, 2013 9:00 pm

Yes FCPX brings home the bacon.
If you think FCPX features are simply returns of FCP7 features you really are ignorant about FCPX implementation.

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My first “professional” editing gig was cutting with Premiere. Next I cut on Avid for six years and even became a certified Avid trainer. I switched to FCP at v2.0 because I needed and NLE that was resolution independent. I’ve been cutting on FCP five days a week (at least) ever since. I won a Telly award this year for a piece I cut on the making of The Avengers. When FCPX first came out I didn’t even look at it because I could see right away that it wasn’t going to work for me. Things evolved and this year I made the switch. It was painful at first because so much has changed, but now when I have to open FCP7 to access an old project it feels and acts like a dinosaur.

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Lang Elliott
June 21, 2013 5:18 pm

Ultimately, it is the quality of the content, the end product, that will define who is a “pro” and who isn’t. Old tools of the trade (tape based camcorders, etc.) will die off and new editing technology that fully embraces current capture tools will come to dominate. Those who produce compelling content, no matter what editor they rely on, will be the “pros” that receive the accolades. Will old pros become new pros, or will they just die a certain and slow death?

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I love both Premiere CC and FCPX!
Both are like different children to love.

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Well there is a unique reaction. Very different from most above. You’re like a person with dual citizenship. But you’re right, there are things to love about both of them.

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FCP7 -2- X user!
June 22, 2013 1:41 am

It’s funny. I read these posts and thought I was in a time machine and had just waken up the day after FCPX was released! All this unnecessary bashing of FCPX a couple of years later by those who either didn’t try it, tried it in its early days, or are simply regurgitating what they’ve heard from others is simply childish.
Come on guys! Whether FCP has left the building or not in your mind, it’s a robust, professional program suitable for cutting anything needed. You just had to be patient with it. I agree that Apple screwed up by releasing it too early and got bad press because of it; but they corrected the problem with updates. As a former FCP7 user who moved to FCPX right from the get go, was disappointed at first but persevered through the frustration, I’m currently ecstatic that I did! It’s currently a great program that is both user friendly and extremely efficient. And thank you CrumplePop for your great plugins! Keep ‘em coming! :)

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I converted my entire company to FCPX a year and a half ago and have had an incredible experience.
We do professional video work for large national and international brands, TV commercials and more. We recently won a Telly Award for a 6-month long project shot across the world with over 200 hours of footage spanning 8 different cameras. Completely edited in FCPX. It is a professional editing app and I trust it with my business, and all of my top level clients. Thank you to CrumplePop for a fantastic discussion

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Jon Williamd
June 22, 2013 6:01 am

I owned Media Composer, I owned FCS 2&3. I thought, “For $300 it’s worth a try.” It was, and I haven’t turned back. Love the power and tremendous value I get in Crumplepop products, thanks!

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For those of you saying that no schools teach FCPX. Full Sail just went full on FCPX.

http://www.apple.com/finalcutpro/in-action/full-sail/

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Front Créatif de Montréal | Creation+MTL+QC
June 23, 2013 3:18 am

[...] La compagnie de plug-in CrumplePop vient de mettre un article intéressant sur l’adoption de Final Cut Pro X dans l’industrie. Comme plusieurs autres, CrumplePop a fait le pari de tous miser sur la nouvelle mouture du logiciel d’Apple. Voici leurs histoires résumées en quelques lignes. http://www.crumplepop.com/blog/?p=632 [...]

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Yes, some of us are still deeply annoyed with X, but the challenge is ours to have a strategy for moving forward. Freelancer editors need to know multiple platforms, but as a company with several editors running multiple machines, this problem is quite vexing.

How should we deal with training reluctant personnel, evolving our plugins and useful but aging hardware, and choosing a platform from a vendor on whom we can rely?

This last is the deepest thorn; we want to switch to X, but we no longer trust Apple to support the pro community long term. We simply do not appear to play a significant role in the business strategy.

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Final Cut is “the” soft ware i always upgrade when a new one is release but to be sincere with everyone when i saw the FCX just the interface puts me aways. Everything about it looks like a home video editing platform i own one but i have not used it yet nevertheless i read reviews and watch tutorials on them and it looks grate. As a matter of facts i have already fall in love with the new color grading tools but because of the interface i am still not multivated to even install it.

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FCPX and Useful Discussion vs. Useless Debate | Dare Dreamer Magazine
June 24, 2013 12:02 pm

[...] about the program and it’s viability as a professional non-linear editor. I was reading a blog post by Gabe Chiefetz, founder and president of CrumplePop, a leading developer of FCPX plugins. He was [...]

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Walker Bell
June 24, 2013 2:46 pm

Why bother having to bet your company…you list a hundred companies when 10′s of thousands moved to Adobe Premiere.
With the new features in Premiere CC Adobe, listened, unlike Apple, to the pro creative community and finished a great set of tools.

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Interesting read, all of it, comments included. A bit too much emotion from both camps, imho, but it all stands out that each tool has its fanbase well attached.

I’ve never been much of one to bash in public, but I didn’t see the FCP movement in television as one of choosing a better tool over, say, Avid. It seemed to me to be more about price-point, the bean-counters and producers tearing down the Avid editors’ arguments until it was proven that making shows was possible with FCP, without the huge overhead Avid and Unity represented. I follow the money, and only jumped on FCP training when it was clear that was necessary to remain employed. Adobe is now, not even next… and no one, at least not enough jobs paying for an editor of nearly two-decades (both in the corporate boutiques and more recently broadcast) is listing jobs seeking FC-X.

That said, a hammer is a hammer is a hammer, and I’ll surely run rEFIt on my Macs so I can cleanly multi-boot for each, FCP7, MC6.5, Premier CC, and if need be FC-X… -IF- there is enough call for it professionally.

As of now, I see FC-X mostly touted by what is referred to as “pro-sumer” market leaders, and while that is just fine, it has likely made the fight for FC-X in the broadcast TV/News station environment much, much harder.

I think I’m secretly hoping Avid and Adobe win out though, if only because it means I can build faster, stronger PCs for less. I think it would take a few more years for most post departments to justify going all-PC, but the days of all-Mac post departments are threatened unless FC-X makes a big leap forward in industry perception.

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I should add, CNN moved to Adobe. Shows like Springer and Maury may have moved out of NYC, but they never left Avid… My station was split Avid/FCP7, and is clearly moving on… but NOT to FC-X . Avid may have released their $50/month plan too late to compete with Adobe’s.

Who, if anyone, is going FC-X in NYC?

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Hello everyone and good day! :)

I just wanted to point out that the one thing we need to watch out for with subscription based apps is that the cost accumulates. For example since I got FCPX 3 years ago I have only spent $299 since. If I would have been on a subscription model I would have spent more than $1800 and counting. Plus I still get constant updates and at a much faster rate than I have ever seen before on any prior Final Cut version.

Also, listening to Digital Cinema Cafe’s Podcasts it seems a lot of professional editors and boutiques are using the new Final Cut Pro or coming back to it.

I completely agree that best tool is the one that we know best. However I believe Final Cut did stumble big time, but it has gotten back up and is showing a strong comeback and deserves a second chance.

Thank you for your time and have an amazing weekend! Now go and get creative! :)

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